Glass Gardens

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The Glass Gardens,[1] also called the Glass Garden[1] and the glass gardens,[2] is a garden at Winterfell. Its produce helps to feed the castle during winter.[1]

Layout

The greenhouse has a glass roof of green and yellow panes[3] locked in frames.[4] The natural hot springs beneath Winterfell fill the glass gardens with a moist warmth and prevent the ground from freezing.[2]

Vegetables,[5][1] fruits,[1] and flowers[6] are grown in the garden.

History

In the legend of Bael the Bard, Lord Brandon Stark asked Sygerrik of Skagos (Bael) what he wanted as a reward for his singing. The bard requested only the most beautiful flower blooming in Winterfell's gardens, so Lord Stark presented him with a winter rose. The following morning, the maiden daughter of Lord Stark had disappeared, and in her bed was the blue rose.[7]

A man in the glass gardens gives a blackberry to Bran Stark whenever the boy visits.[5] From atop the First Keep, Bran likes to watch cooks tend vegetables in the glass gardens.[5]

Recent Events

A Clash of Kings

The glass panes of the gardens are turned into shards during the sack of Winterfell.[3]

A Storm of Swords

Jon Snow wishes he could give one of Winterfell's flowers to Ygritte.[6]

Sansa Stark includes the glass gardens while making a snow castle of Winterfell while at the Eyrie.[4]

A Feast for Crows

Arya Stark recalls the warm, earthy smell of the glass gardens.[8]

A Dance with Dragons

The ruins of Winterfell are covered in snow. On the broken panes of the Glass Gardens, Theon Greyjoy sees hoarfrost sparkling in the moonlight. The fruits and vegetables within are black and frozen.[1]

Quotes

It was always warm, even when it snowed. Water from the hot springs is piped through the walls to warm them, and inside the glass gardens it was always like the hottest day of summer.[4]

References