Difference between revisions of "Lord Costayne (Aerys I)"

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(Lord Costayne)
 
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Lord Costayne succeeded his [[Lord Costayne (Daeron II)|father]] as head of the house.{{Ref|TMK}}
 
Lord Costayne succeeded his [[Lord Costayne (Daeron II)|father]] as head of the house.{{Ref|TMK}}
  
In {{Date|212}}, Lord Costayne came with his retinue to [[Whitewalls]] to attend the [[wedding]] of his father-in-law, Lord [[Ambrose Butterwell]], and his second wife, [[Lady Frey (wife of Ambrose Butterwell)|Lady Frey]]. On his way, Lord Costayne had to cross the [[God's Eye]] via a ferry. He quarrelled with [[Lord Shawney]] on the matter of which lord should cross first; Shawney argued that as the older of the two he should go first, whereas Costayne believed that as his House was noblier then Shawney's, he had the precedence.{{Ref|TMK}}
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In {{Date|212}}, Lord Costayne came with his retinue to [[Whitewalls]] to attend the [[wedding]] of his father-in-law, Lord [[Ambrose Butterwell]], and his second wife, [[Lady Frey (wife of Ambrose Butterwell)|Lady Frey]]. On his way, Lord Costayne had to cross the [[God's Eye]] via a ferry. He quarrelled with [[Lord Shawney]] on the matter of which lord should cross first; Shawney argued that as the older of the two he should go first, whereas Costayne believed that as his House was nobler then Shawney's, he had the precedence.{{Ref|TMK}}
  
 
During the wedding feast, Lord Costayne was seated on the dais. The next day, he competed in the [[Wedding tourney at Whitewalls|wedding tourney]] but lost to Ser [[Glendon Flowers]]. He sent his [[squire]] to ransom the [[w:Sorrel (horse)|sorrel]] he lost but Glendon decided to keep the [[horse]]. The angry lord told Glendon he had no right to use [[Quentyn Ball|Fireball]]'s coat of arms. When Glendon is falsely accused of stealing a [[dragon egg]], Lord Costayne advocated for Glendon to die.{{Ref|TMK}}
 
During the wedding feast, Lord Costayne was seated on the dais. The next day, he competed in the [[Wedding tourney at Whitewalls|wedding tourney]] but lost to Ser [[Glendon Flowers]]. He sent his [[squire]] to ransom the [[w:Sorrel (horse)|sorrel]] he lost but Glendon decided to keep the [[horse]]. The angry lord told Glendon he had no right to use [[Quentyn Ball|Fireball]]'s coat of arms. When Glendon is falsely accused of stealing a [[dragon egg]], Lord Costayne advocated for Glendon to die.{{Ref|TMK}}

Latest revision as of 15:28, 15 January 2020

House Costayne.svg
Lord Costayne
House Costayne.svg
Title Lord of the Three Towers[1]
Allegiance House Costayne
Culture Reach
Spouse A daughter of Ambrose Butterwell
Book(s) The Mystery Knight (appears)

Lord Costayne was the Lord of the Three Towers and the head of House Costayne during the reign of King Aerys I Targaryen. He was married to one of Lord Ambrose Butterwell's daughters.[1]

Character

He was younger than Lord Shawney.[1]

History

Lord Costayne succeeded his father as head of the house.[1]

In 212 AC, Lord Costayne came with his retinue to Whitewalls to attend the wedding of his father-in-law, Lord Ambrose Butterwell, and his second wife, Lady Frey. On his way, Lord Costayne had to cross the God's Eye via a ferry. He quarrelled with Lord Shawney on the matter of which lord should cross first; Shawney argued that as the older of the two he should go first, whereas Costayne believed that as his House was nobler then Shawney's, he had the precedence.[1]

During the wedding feast, Lord Costayne was seated on the dais. The next day, he competed in the wedding tourney but lost to Ser Glendon Flowers. He sent his squire to ransom the sorrel he lost but Glendon decided to keep the horse. The angry lord told Glendon he had no right to use Fireball's coat of arms. When Glendon is falsely accused of stealing a dragon egg, Lord Costayne advocated for Glendon to die.[1]

The fate of Lord Costayne following the arrival at Whitewalls of the Hand of the King, Brynden Rivers, is unknown.

Quotes

It's death that one deserves, not justice![1]

—Lord Costayne about Glendon Flowers

References